Bottle feeding

Bottle feeding

Unsettled and irritable behavior, known as fussing, is by far the most commonly known crying behavior in babies. Clinical studies show that the AVENT Bottle significantly reduces fussing* and colic.** Fussing is reduced especially at night.*

Convenient storage for breast milk

Breastfeeding mothers want maximum protection and convenience when storing precious breast milk. That's why Philips AVENT has two storage systems that are reliable, hygienic and easy to use.

* A clinical study showed that at two weeks of age, babies showed less fussing than babies fed with another leading bottle.
** A clinical study showed that at two weeks of age babies fed with an Philips AVENT bottle showed a trend to less colic than babies fed with a conventional bottle.

Clinically proven: Less fussing, especially at night.*

Sleep and nutrition are vital to your baby’s health and happiness. Clinical studies show that the AVENT bottle is clinically proven to reduce fussing* and colic.** Fussing is reduced especially at night.*

Clinical evidence

* A clinical study showed that at two weeks of age, babies showed less fussing than babies fed with another leading bottle. ** A clinical study showed that at two weeks of age babies fed with an Philips AVENT bottle showed a trend to less colic than babies fed with a conventional bottle.
Read the full clinical study

Easy to combine breast and bottle

The naturally-shaped nipple, combined with the fact that your baby controls milk flow more like breastfeeding, makes it easier to combine breast and bottle.

How it works

As your baby feeds, the unique skirt on the AVENT nipple flexes to allow air into the bottle, preventing any vacuum build-up.

This allows your baby to suckle almost as at the breast. Listen for the gentle whistling sound and watch the air bubbles burst on the surface of the milk. That's your guarantee that the air is being released into the bottle — not into your baby's tummy.

Available in 3 sizes:

Philips AVENT feeding bottles

  • 4 oz
  • 9 oz
  • 11 oz
All sizes available in single and twin packs.

Bottle feeding guide

Read our useful guide containing bottle feeding tips and advice such as; how many bottles you will need to get started, different types of nipple and how to bottle feed.

Open a pdf file

Choosing the right nipple for your baby

Our nipples come with five different flow rates. You will know when your baby is ready to move onto a faster flow rate because he or she will try to suck harder to get the milk more quickly. He or she may also show signs of tiredness or frustration during feeding. Remember that age indications are approximate as babies develop at different rates.

Newborn Flow | 0M+
1 hole
Slow Flow | 1M+
2 holes
Medium Flow | 3M+
3 holes
Fast Flow | 6M+
4 holes

Extra Soft Silicone Nipple
Ideal for newborn and breastfed babies of all ages.

Extra Soft Silicone Nipple
Ideal for newborn and breastfed babies of all ages.

Soft Silicone Nipple
Ideal for bottle-fed babies at 3 months of age and up.

Soft Silicone Nipple
Offers a faster flow for older babies.

Variable Flow | 3M+

Soft Silicone Nipple
Slot Cut provides an extra fast flow and accommodates thicker liquids. Flow rate can be varied by turning the bottle to align the I, II or III markings on the nipple with the baby's nose.

Fussing & colic

A certain amount of crying and fussing is normal with an infant. It's how they tell us when they're hungry, tired or in need of a change. Fussing, is by far the most commonly known crying behavior in babies, but continuous crying without reason may be a sign of colic.

Different types of crying behaviours

There are three main types of crying behaviours in newborns:

  • Crying - periods of intense distressed vocalization.
  • Fussy - baby unsettled and irritable. They may be vocalizing but not continously crying.
  • Colic - bouts of intense unsoothable crying.
What is fussing?

A certain amount of fussing is considered normal in babies. Like colic, fussing results in crying, unsettled or irritable behavior. However, what mainly distinguishes a fussy baby from a colicky one is the level of discomfort and apparent distress, which is noticeably less in a fussy baby.

What is colic?

No one knows for sure why colic occurs. Common theories suggest it may be caused by spasms as the digestive system learns to process food, excess wind from air swallowed whilst feeding, lack of good bacteria in the gut or allergies to cow's milk. Although we can't know for sure, fortunately colic is not a serious medical condition.

How long will colic last?

Colic typically appears within the first week or two of life and reaches a peak around six weeks, usually disappearing between the ages of 2-4 months. Don't worry if you feel frustrated. Remember this is completely normal. If you do need support don’t feel guilty to ask for help, or confide in family.

Signs to identify colic
  • Crying in the late afternoon or evening, usually after feeding
  • High-pitched crying and screaming
  • Red face, clenched fists and scrunched up eyes
  • Legs drawn to the tummy
  • A distended abdomen
  • Passing wind
The rule of 3

Paediatricians often recommend the "Rule of 3" to diagnose infant colic. Has your baby been crying for three or more hours a day, at least three times per week, for the last three months? If so she or he could be one of the 25% of newborns suffering from colic.

What you can do to help

There is no known cure as of yet. However, using the Philips AVENT bottle has been clinically proven to reduce infant colic and fussing by limiting the air that your baby ingests with our anti-colic valve. Feeding your baby slowly, in an upright position whilst regularly burping can also have a positive effect.

Read more


Bottle feeding guide

Read our useful guide containing bottle feeding tips and advice such as; how many bottles you will need to get started, different types of nipple and how to bottle feed.

Open a pdf file
Guide to soothe colic & fussing

While no single method works for everyone, many mums have found helpful tricks for calming their babies. Discover what works for yours with our colic soothing guide.

Open a pdf file

Frequently asked questions

Bottles
What is Bisphenol A (BPA)?

BPA is a chemical used primarily in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Polycarbonate plastic has been used for baby bottles (as well as water bottles, medical devices, sports equipment, etc.) because it is less likely to crack or shatter, which can lead to injuries.

Why do some scientists think that BPA used in bottles is dangerous?

Some scientists are worried that BPA can leach from the plastic into liquid held in the baby bottle, especially when bottles are heated to extreme temperatures, and that the chemical may affect the body, particularly in young children. It’s important to note that to-date there have been no definitive studies on the effects of BPA on humans, and the evidence available today is based mainly on the study of laboratory animals such as mice.

Do Philips AVENT baby bottles include BPA?

We only sell feeding solutions made with BPA-free materials in North America. This includes all of our reusable baby bottles, pacifiers and breast pumps.

How will I know if a product is BPA free?

The packaging of products which do not contain BPA is clearly labeled ‘BPA-free’.

What do you mean by ‘feeding solution’?

A feeding solution is a product that has contact with food or liquid consumed by a baby. It includes all of our reusable baby bottles, pacifiers and breast pumps.

Have you recalled bottles that contain BPA?

No. We have confidence in our full range of bottles, which meet or exceed the standards set by regulatory bodies in every country that we operate in.

Does Philips AVENT agree with the advice not to put boiling water in bottles that include BPA?

If parents are concerned we suggest they boil water in their kettle and allow it to cool in the kettle for a time before pouring it directly into a sterilized bottle and using it to make a feed.

Are microwave sterilizers safe to use?

We can speak only for the Philips AVENT microwave sterilizer. Microwave sterilizers have been used for a number of years and provide a fast, efficient and effective method of sterilizing for busy parents. The Philips AVENT microwave sterilizer passes all relevant safety standards. It also does not contain BPA as it is made from polypropylene.

Are steam sterilizers safe to use?

Again, we can only speak for our steam sterilizer which passes all relevant global safety standards for electrical products. It does not contain BPA as it is made from polypropylene.

What number are Philips AVENT bottles? I’ve heard that #7 are should be avoided.

The number 7 that many people refer to often appears as follows:

It does NOT indicate whether an item contains BPA. It is a globally used labeling scheme that tells people the type of plastic and how / if it can be recycled. The number 7 is used for several plastics, including those that contain BPA as well as those that DO NOT CONTAIN BPA. Simply looking for recycling code 7 will not determine whether it contains BPA. To help parents, Philips AVENT clearly labels the packaging of BPA-free products as BPA-free.

Why does no number appear on the Philips AVENT bottle?

These symbols were created to identify plastics for recycling purposes. To help parents, Philips AVENT clearly labels the packaging of BPA-free products as BPA-free.

Does Philips AVENT agree with the advice not to use scratched or damaged bottles?

Yes. This is already indicated in our directions for use where it states: Excessive concentrations of detergents may eventually cause plastic components to crack. Should this occur, replace immediately. We recommend this course of action not because the bottles contain BPA but because cracked bottles are more challenging to clean and can be dangerous as liquid may leak out from the bottle and can result in injury to the infant.

What are Philips AVENT’s BPA-free bottles made from?

• Poylethersulphone – commonly called PES. A BPA-free plastic with a honey color.


• Polypropylene – commonly called PP. A BPA-free plastic with a slightly milky hue.

What steps does Philips AVENT take today to recycle its polycarbonate baby bottles that contain the chemical BPA?

Philips AVENT polycarbonate baby bottles are recycled through local recycling channels that are in place through local government and/or environmental authorities in each country.

Healthcare Professionals

Our healthcare professional site has educational materials and clinical studies covering topics from breastfeeding to toddler feeding.


Go to Healthcare Professional site

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About Philips Avent

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